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Month: March, 2019

String Quartet no 15, Opus 144 – Dmitri Shostakovich

title-page-and-key-monogram-of-the-mountain-lover.jpg!Large

     Title page and key monogram of “The Mountain Lover” (c. 1895)

                                         

          Aubrey Beardsley

 

               ___________

 

 

after John passed away, I read, at a

gathering we had for him, something 

that I’d written in his honour, it began,

adagios always remind me of John,

John was a dancer, he walked like

one

  

a few days later, immersed as I

was in memories of him while 

mechanically washing some 

dishes, I heard, from symphony 

I’d put on in the background to

keep me company in my reverie,

its adagio

 

I dried my hands, put my arms

around myself, and we danced

to the end of the movement, I’d  

found, I understood, utterly, I

believed, miraculously, a key to

the very hereafter, adagios

would henceforth always

remind me of John

 

some time later, flipping aimlessly

through string quartets, of

Shostakovich among others, I  

happened upon this one, his 15th

String Quartet, Opus 144, which

had, to my astonishment, not one,

not two, not three, not even four

nor five, but six whole adagios,

this was John talking, I knew,

I’ve loved it ever since

 

listen

 

 

R ! chard

 

psst:

 

   String Quartet no 15, Opus 144

 

        l – Elegy: Adagio  

      ll – Serenade: Adagio  

     lll – Intermezzo: Adagio

     lV – Nocturne: Adagio

      V – Funeral March: Adagio molto

    Vl – Epilogue: Adagio

 

                              Dmitri Shostakovich

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adagios

adagio-1899.jpg!Large

   Adagio (1899) 

 

       Tom Roberts


           _______

   

                           for my mom

 

my mom, the other day, said she’d

looked up adagio in the dictionary, 

after having read a recent post I’d

submittedas well, andante, and 

allegro 

 

well, that took long enough, I 

thought, but concluded that we all 

get the information we need in our 

own good time, and it’s never, ever, 

too late 

 

they’re all tempi, of course, adagio 

is slow, from ad agio in Italian, in 

English, at ease, the other two are 

incrementally faster  

 

the adagio doesn’t usually stand 

alone, it is too somber a pace to

immediately attract attention, it

therefore mostly fits into other 

compositions that have a more 

vigorous, a more engaging, 

introduction, usually as its 

second movement 

 

but here’s Albinoni’s Adagio in G 

minor, a work of only one segment, 

which indeed would’ve been part  

of a trio sonata, purportedly, had 

Albinoni lived to complete it

 

the rule is not fast, Beethoven 

starts his “Moonlight” Sonata with 

an adagio, for instance, boldly and 

unforgettably, indeed immortally

 

here’s the adagio that always 

stops my breath, from Schubert’s

masterpiece for string quintet, his

D956

 

listen

 


R ! chard

a sonata / a suite of Robert Schumann

big-zoo-triptych.jpg!Large

    “Big Zoo, Triptych (1913) 

 

             August Macke

  

              __________

 

if a sonata is a piece of music with 

more than one segment, and a 

suite is also a piece of music with 

more than one segment, what’s 

the difference, you’ll ask, not 

unreasonably  

 

a sonata speaks for itself, as itself, 

is itself, whereas a suite, also in 

several sections, describes 

something else, something not 

itself, but a place, or an action, it’s

a tale, not an autobiography

 

this has some implications, the 

sonata will consequently be more 

expansive, displaying not only 

emotional impact, but also 

technical wizardry, will beat its 

chest, in other words, whether in 

agony or in bombast, whereas 

suite, while not excluding  

necessarily those aspects, will 

usually be more demure, objective

snap its suspenders less 

 

a suite also has more movements 

than the sonata’s usual three or 

four, consider the difference 

between, in art, a triptych, for

instance, and a collage, they’re

in either case artworks, but with

different intentions

 

does any of this matter, to the

aficionado it does, if you want to

buy a home, you could be looking

for a duplex instead of a condo, if

you’re listening to music, you

might  prefer chamber pieces to

large orchestras, suites to sonatas

 

Robert Scumann’s “Kinderszenen“,

or “Scenes from Childhood“,

though not yet identified, in 1838,

as a suite, since the term hadn’t

been used that way yet, is

nevertheless not any different

in kind from Debussy’s later

Children’s Corner“, 1908, so  

that the label fits, however

retroactively  

 

you could say the same of Beethoven’s 

“Pastorale” Symphony, for instance,

it’s also, however retroactively, a suite

 

but here’s Schumann’s Second Piano 

Sonata, to compare with his

Kinderszenen“, to get back to my

original subject, the difference

between a suite an a sonata

 

listen

 

R ! chard

“Années de pèlerinage”, 3rd Year – Liszt

1024px-Villa_d'Este_01.jpg

      Villa d’Este 

 

         ______

 

                      

                                   for my friend, Elizabeth, who just

                                       recently passed away, may her

                                            own pilgrimage be blessed

 

 

 

  here’s Liszt’s “Années de pèlerinage”, 3rd Year 

 

        1. Angélus! Prière aux anges gardiens

        2. Aux cyprès de la Villa D’Este, Threnody (l)

        3. Aux cyprès de la Villa D’Este, Threnody (ll) ((ll)

        4. Les jeux de la Villa D’Este

        5. Sunt Lacrymae rerum (en mode Hongrois)

                        These are tears for things (in Hungarian mode)

        6. Marche funèbre (en mémoire de

                    Maximilien. Empereur de Mexique, 19 juin, 1867)

        7. Sursum corda (Erhebet eure Herzen)  


compare Liszt’s Marche funèbre“, click

here or above, with Beethoven’s own

Marcia funebre sulla morte d’un eroe 

from his 12th Sonata, you’ll hear the 

stirrings of Impressionism peeping out 

from the roots of Romanticism, 

Beethoven, in 1801, is firm, solid, direct,

poignant, while Liszt, 1877, is more 

diffuse, improvisational, evocative, his 

is an idiosyncratic marche funèbre 


compare either two with Chopin’s 

“Marche funèbre” from his Piano

Sonata no 2, 1840, as Romantic as 

Beethoven’s still, and as implanted

in our collective consciousness,

where Liszt’s more esoteric 

interpretation of such a march has

essentially been forgotten

 

should it be, what do you think, you

tell me

 

 

R ! chard